The Art of Animation – Harley Quinn DC Animated Series

The Art of Animation – Harley Quinn DC Animated Series


Hello everyone. While Marvel Cinematic Universe may dominate
the big screen, DC has been consistently making stellar animations for years, but even with
such pedigree, adult animated series is still a difficult venture. Enter Harley Quinn, a rapid-fire of pure entertainment
with unapologetic adult humor and oddly irresistible charm. Don’t let the retro animation fools you,
Harley Quinn is one-of-a-kind experience of sudden gore and unhinged mature comedy. She’s been in many animations before, such
as Batman: Assault on Arkham or Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay, but none of them even came close
in term of insanity. When DC launched their own streaming service,
DC Universe, they have more freedom on creative department than they had on television or
direct-to-video format, where most of their animations were broadcast. Doom Patrol is a good example of a series
that benefited from this less restricted streaming format and much more mature theme. Harley Quinn animation takes it even further
with balls to the wall mayhem. Admittedly, first time seeing the old animation
style with limbs or head being chopped off was a bit jarring, but in wacky serendipitous
way it soon became amusingly entertaining display. DC animation has various styles, recently
it leans towards semi realistic tone for better body definition and movement, especially on
action sequences. However, the old school cartoon style has
a few advantages, it’s a familiar look for weekly animated show like in 90s Batman series. Also, some of the quirky shenanigans just
work too damn well with this visual style. A lot of the hilarious scenes, lightning-quick
edits and visual gags are perfect match to the cartoonish look. It also helps with the fast pace of the story,
which follows Harley Quinn as she breaks up with Joker and tries to find a place of her
own. She’s joined by her best friend Poison Ivy
and a crew of misfits, along with your usual familiar faces from DC universe. This series is a breath of fresh air, it doesn’t
pull any punches, delivering so many crude jokes with surprisingly relatable theme for
young adult. It’s like DC had been suppressing the insanity
and finally got a chance to unleash it, kinda like Chris Evans after ten years of being
Captain America. The script is sharp and direct, it needs to
be considering it only has around 20 minutes per episode to deliver the comedy and character
development, yet it’s never without wit or charm. Most episodes serve as weekly shenanigans,
another one of Harley’s antics while building towards a larger story involving her abusive
ex, the joker. It takes relevant mature subjects like building
trust in friendship or recovering from bad relationship then put a mad villainous twist
to them. The over-the-top presentations, the use of
pop culture references, the ensuing inevitable chaos, are bizarre yet brilliant comedy. A lot of the credit also goes to the voice
actors. Kaley Cuoco as Harley Quinn has the unique
high pitch squeal, the classic signature of Harley. She also delivers on more grounded scenes
where Harley needs to face many humiliating moments. When these rather embarrassing instances happen,
Lake Bell as Poison Ivy, is usually there by her side. This has to be the most adorable rendition
of Poison Ivy on-screen, she’s such a good and endearing friend. Her character is down to earth and serves
as voice of reason to Harley’s chaotic personality, she also sounds incredibly normal and oddly
amicable. Harley’s crew consists of Clayface, a shapeshifter
with a penchant for the theatric, Mr. Psycho, the ladies’ man and plot device with telepathic
ability and also King Shark, a juvenile shark who works as a tech support and ironically
the most versatile killer among them. All these characters, including the recurring
ones have slightly twisted yet entirely delightful personalities, even Frank, Ivy’s companion
who doubles as bizarre pet plant. The series shows much respect to these characters
and with a long running weekly format, it takes the chance to development them as well. This might be the most care DC has given to
their cast in recent memory, not just on animation but their entire universe. They all have their moments under the spotlight
while playing to each other’s strength. In any other series, these misfits might only
amount to B-grade crew but Harley Quinn gives them just the right platform to shine, even
if they resort to some bleeped out words and sudden gush of blood. However, being an adult animated series mean
this might not be a decent consumption for younger audience. While I don’t think it’s outright terrible,
but there are some brash dialogues and a few of the visceral scenes are quite grimace inducing. Other than that Harley Quinn is perfectly
recommended for everyone, especially young adult or those who want more punch from superhero
series. Its 20 minutes runtime passed by, almost too
quickly, if there’s any flaw to this series, it’s there’s not enough of it. Harley Quinn knocks it out of the park with
brazen use of mature humor and excellent care to already beloved whimsical character. It’s a completely fun experience the likes
of which DC probably never imagine they’d be capable on creating, it’s such an insanely
addictive animation series Thank you for watching, please leave a like
and comment. Consider subscribing and share with your friends. I make 3 videos every week, have a nice day
and I’ll see you in the next one.

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