Recording Ourselves

Recording Ourselves


Vsauce! Kevin here. My image and voice recorded,
backed up, uploaded and saved…forever. Your cat photos, political arguments, the
first private message you sent your future husband or wife, your comments on this video
– authenticated, labeled, and recorded. Somewhere. For as long as someone is around to keep the
lights on. For the first time in human history. Ordinary
people will never be forgotten. At least half of what makes you – you. In Documenting Individual Identity, Jane Caplan
explains identity as having two parts. There’s the subjective you, the “self-same.” You
know who you are because you are you. You have your memory, which Oscar Wilde called,
“…the diary that we all carry about with us.” And then there’s the “sameness with another”
half of your identity – what others can know. That includes classifications others assign
to you to identify and make sense of you. And until you can upload your consciousness
to BrainTube, this may be the only part of your identity capable of being recorded. The
categorical checkboxes and evidence you leave behind. And we’ve been obsessively trying to record
ourselves long before selfie sticks. The oldest way to archive yourself is to pass
on your DNA and name. Offspring have received patronymic and matronymic names consistently
across cultures and some traditions pass down the same exact name. The longest-running name
suffix tradition came from the German House Of Reuss, which named every son Heinrich all
the way up to Count Heinrich LXXV – who ended the line with his death as an infant. And in 2010, Christopher Columbus XX, a naval
veteran who sailed around the world, returned to Panama 500 years after his ancestor’s last
voyage. But the first widely-used device to express
our individual identity to others was the cylinder seal. Invented in Mesopotamia, they
were carved out of stone and used to create an impression in moist clay. These seals marked
personal property, served as signatures on official documents and were often buried with
their owners alongside other precious items like gold and silver. By 3500 BC they advanced
to state a person’s name, occupation and where they lived. For example, this seal depicts a King holding
back two gryphons, which expressed his ability to control the chaotic forces of nature. And
these symbols on the left represent his personal identity. But cylinder seals weren’t exclusive
to Kings and the elite – they were worn around the necks of the general public and losing
one was the equivalent today of losing your ID and credit card. If you were a weaver, your cylinder seal may
feature a spider. If you were Apilsha the weaver, you might include a mark above the
spider to differentiate yourself from Zuzu the weaver who places a mark on the right
side of his spider. As civilization advances and communities grow
larger, it takes more to stand out. Ask squirrels. The size of a group of squirrels, called a
scurry, directly influences the individuality of signals used to choose a mate. So whether
you’re talking about Belding’s ground squirrel or high school, the larger the group
– the more symbols of individuality play a role in getting a date. The longest lasting human symbols of identity
are set in stone. The Pyramids, tombs built to protect and preserve Pharaohs and their
legacies, were constructed with joints so tight that no water can get in and from stone
so hard that no water can penetrate it.  Which is why your neighbor’s house may be falling
down but pharaoh Khufu’s tomb is still standing after 4,500 years. From timeless structures to timeless culture,
carved in stone on the front of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi was a simple aphorism:
“Know Thyself.” The most famous of the 147 Delphic Maxims, a list of truths to live
by, it highlighted the importance of identity as early as 6th century BC.   Sages, leaders, and human experience continued
to develop life’s instruction manual, but it took another two thousand years for the
first evidence of a common person saving their data every day. Diary or journal. Both words come from latin
– diarium meaning “daily allowance” and diurnus meaning “of the day.” Luca Landucci, an apothecary who learned to
write by bookkeeping for his accountant father, chronicled the city’s events, which were equal
parts news and drama. It was eventually copied and passed throughout Tuscany, which makes
Landucci’s blog the first to go viral. But his actions were an anomaly for hundreds
of years to follow. Before 1700, we have accounts of fewer than 500 diaries. Total. Today, there
are over a billion users active on Facebook every day talking about their lives and checking
in on others. The oldest known diary is Marcus Aurelius’
Meditations, in which he advises, “Do not act as if you were going to live a thousand
years, soon you’ll be ashes or bone. A mere name at most – and even that is just a sound
– an echo.” But saving sounds wasn’t possible until
the development of the phonautograph. Alexander Graham Bell’s version used a severed human
ear attached to a stylus. When he shouted into the ear, his voice was etched into glass. Our voices were the most reliable way to pass
personal stories through oral tradition, epic tales and song. The first songs were inscribed
in cuneiform on clay but only fragments survived. The Seikilos Epitaph, the earliest known complete
song, was recorded in ancient Greek musical notation on a stele – a stone funerary monument. And there’s a reason one of the oldest songs
was carved into a tombstone: death has historically been our impetus to preserve the details of
life. Not just marking graves, building temples, erecting monuments or painting funeral portraits,
but by creating probate records. The word probate comes directly from the latin
‘probare’ meaning ‘to prove’ – the documents created at death to prove a person
lived. My own middle name came from my great grandfather
– Julius Lieber. This genealogy book contains an entry about him that describes his entire
life, a father of six, an engineer, a skilled mechanic, with 98 words. I’m only three
generations removed from having a written legacy that fits in four tweets. The elements of our identities we want to
record haven’t changed much in thousands of years. Egyptian sculptor Bak created a selfie
of him with his wife in 1345 BC. Bamboo slips with a single column of Chinese characters
were like Tweets in 300 BC. The Republic of Letters exchanged ideas across Europe like
a 17th century Facebook group. And every one of your Instagrammed food photos would be
carefully scrutinized by Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, who said, “Tell me what you eat; I will tell
you what you are.” Often abbreviated to, “You are what you eat.” But the immediacy and the volume have very
recently changed – astronomically. In 1995, 16 million people were connected by the internet
–  we’re now over 3.2 billion. Uploading home videos, wishing a Happy Birthday to our
cousin’s best friend’s sister, reading about and interacting with people we’ll
never meet face to face. The data we transfer is predicted to reach 88.4 exabytes per month
— that’s 88.4 billion gigabytes. Storage numbers are getting so big we’re struggling
to find ways to label them. And recording equipment that was once prohibitively
expensive is now probably in your pocket. The free apps in a smartphone represent $900,000
worth of equipment about thirty years ago. Copying a book before the 12th century was
a lonely task reserved for trained monks that could take a year, which is why one scribal
note at the end of a book stated, “Finally that’s finished, now give me some wine!” Today,
with a Google Fiber connection and about three days, you could hypothetically download all
37.8 million books stored at the Library Of Congress. Until the end of the late 1800s, low literacy
rates meant most people couldn’t write about themselves even if they wanted to. By the
1950s, we made a legitimate attempt to create a database of dreams. And today, smart bracelets
record our every heartbeat. But heartbeat data isn’t…really…us.
So who are we recording? Your ID, which was developed after nations
realized they could no longer rely on a note signed by a dignitary pinned to the hat of
a courier as sufficient proof of identification, records your height, birth date, and eye color. Your social media profiles add identifiers
like your favorite music or sports teams, friends, and pictures of you wearing your
favorite outfits. It’s a far cry from the 14th century, when the majority of people
had the wardrobe of a cartoon character, with “wanted posters” describing criminals
by their one set of clothes. We now have access to a previously unimaginable
number of identifiers, and ways of recording that are so easy we don’t even realize we’re
doing it. Immortality may be part of the new normal. The Ancient Egyptians had to preserve their
bodies through mummification, their internal organs in canopic jars, and their faces with
death masks, all in the hope that their soul would find its way back after death. Back
home. They believed erasing one’s memory on Earth would erase their immortality.   But the Sumerians, those inventors of the
cylinder seal, believed there was no heaven – only hell. And by honoring their dead, buried
safely below or in a shrine next to their house, by giving them food and drink – by
keeping a record of their life –  they could avoid the, “Land Of No Return.” A place we might have eliminated without even
realizing it. And as always – thanks for watching.

100 thoughts on “Recording Ourselves

  1. se la vie

  2. My children will always be my best success.

  3. imagine researching 100 year old youtube videos for history class

  4. SUP ME THE FUTURE

  5. I love this video! Past content from Vsauce 2 has stood out to me from the other channels, but this video seems to be an awesome compromise. The video keeps the much quicker style than the vsauces, but now I feel like I learned a lot from watching it. Very cool! I would love to watch more videos like this

  6. this was published on my birthday

  7. This is what I've been talking about for the last few years! My son is the first generation who will grow up where he can see videos and comments his dad…. grandma and grandpa have made and can understand exactly who these people were before and during him growing up! Its mind boggling

  8. Since theres a lot of people putting their names and history out there in thes comments ill do the same.
    My name is Hunter Hale Clark, named after the hale and hunt lines of my mom mom and wallace clarks of my dad, i am of the line of clan wallace and descendant of the brother of william wallace and the clarks of ireland, married to forge an alliance between scottish military and irish sholarly families and the hales a clan of learned knights in direct service to the black prince of whales, and the hunts a line of hunters employed by nobility of whales for seasonal great hunts and tracking, and i carry the name Hunter Hale Clark proudly for it bears the meaning of the hero that searches for knowledge

  9. Wait wait wait….. Did you contact the big man Sqaq????

  10. I didn't realize it was filmed over 2 years ago. I didn't remember watching it. As I was about to like the video I saw I liked it already. Will it happen again in some years in the future? I don't know, but I leave this comment as a reminder to myself.

  11. This channel is too good

  12. This was magical

  13. Uhm… where did you get your information on cylinder seals from?

  14. I recently learned about my Great-Great-Grandfather (Alf), and some of the things he did. I think it's really cool to learn about these things, remember them, and pass them on. In a way, it's like a little taste of immortality. I learned where he came from and things he did that cross over with my interests even now.
    All my life I've been fascinated by the story of RMS Titanic. I had (still have) a book about Dr Ballard's 1987 voyage to the wreck, and I had my nose in that regularly. Turns out, Great great grandfather Alf was on a ship crossing the Atlantic on that same night. Allegedly, due to radio range, his ship would have been the last ever to hear a radio call from Titanic. They altered course to join in the rescue, but RMS Carpathia got there first and told them they'd gotten all the survivors they could find.
    A few years later, Alf was in the Canadian Army as a medic, but his station got shelled by German artillery and mustard gas in the battle of Passchendale. He survived, but his injuries got him sent home. There, he helped organize and set up the Red Cross and St. John Ambulance in Eastern Canada.
    And a hundred years later, here's me.

  15. "Tell me what you eat, I'll tell you what you are." I already know I'm unhealthy

  16. Here you look like Bill Gates

  17. Went so sad so quick

  18. You sound eerily similar to Matthew Santoro

  19. SHOW MORE…SUPRISE I'M IMMORTAL ; ) And as aways thanks for watching. 010010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 01110011 01110101 01110000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110 01010011 01110100 01110101 01110000 01101001 01100100 0010111001010111 01101000 01111001 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100101 01110110 01100101 01110010 01111001 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01110101 01110011 01101001 01101110 01100111 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 01101111 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101001 01100101 01101110 01110011 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01110101 01101110 01100100 01100101 01110010 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110111 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01110111 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100001 01111001 00100000 01001001 00100000 001101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01100011 01101111 01100100 01100101 01110011 00111111 00100000 01010011 011

  20. ^^

  21. remember us

  22. So this comment will make history!!! What to say, what to say…

    I like turtles!!! 😀

  23. hi

  24. this is recorded

  25. hellabyte

  26. First selfie
    1345 BC

  27. Man, them great pyramids never held no dead folk.

  28. Top Notch

  29. This was magical

  30. really dig the outro song. what is eet?

  31. That 2 speaker TV looks like it has 3

  32. What?

  33. I really like the extra little music video that's appropriate to the subject of the video. Real nice touch.

  34. What I took from this is that the majority of people are most concerned with their legacy as an individual. As opposed to the legacy they leave behind to contribute to society as a whole. Why are we becoming so individualistic? What is the end point for society if we continually reward narcissistic traits??

  35. Oh, I did it again! I liked a Vsauce video before watching it!

  36. Sumerian: Bruh wtf your stone tablets display noise?

  37. 2:23 he listens to music. 8:41 many still can't- dat/doe, wit(with), f with instead of mess, etc. It gets worse and even worse than worse when they actually speak. Where already are Idiocracy. Headed back to speaking like cavemen

  38. "This is deep"
    – racenpotter333 10:35 am September 9th 2018

  39. 5:48 That's where the music for Sid Meier's Civilization came from. Right?????

  40. I was starting to fall asleep when the song came on, and I got very confused

  41. Hi FBI guys

  42. Hi

  43. Anus. There I did it… It will be here for all of human history.

  44. What once was to be considered impossible, now it’s to be considered possible.

    Immortality

  45. Dab

  46. did shaq agree to be in the video? 7:40

  47. Half of what makes me is my phone that is filled with hentai

  48. How will I explain YouTube to my grandchildren?

  49. This comment will be stored somewhere, so I should make good use of it. This comment takes up a tiny bit of storage. My good use of my comment: OOF

  50. Peopled cling too much to life

  51. I like how the clip he used while talking about squirrels wasn't of a squirrel

  52. Base29.abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz .,

  53. 5:00 tell me THAT isn't the most badass thing to say to your worst enemies. hahaha

  54. Youtuber isn't a real occupation, lol

  55. Wow this is saved

  56. Terabyte?
    Not big.

    Relabyte is way bigger. So big that it can store billions and trillions of universe simulations.
    And they are 100% accurate. you are a god lol.
    Lol

  57. The internet could be shut off. So this comment is most likely to disappear and not exist forever

  58. REMEMBER ME!

  59. coool im being recorded right now

  60. Is it weird that I stoped it at this point? 1:08

  61. Is it weirder that I stoped it here too? 6:41

  62. This video is a video

  63. If we don't do anything spectacular in the remaining years of our life we will be forgotten

  64. 2:27 old people had headphones

  65. a chinese 14 year old who is blonde, 6 feet tall, and is a nurse. i'd like to see you try, universe.

  66. So mankind is uploading its identity to the internet? The internet will eventually be a copy of us?

  67. Hellabyte😂 7:56

  68. I WONT BE FORGOTTEN
    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN
    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN
    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN
    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN
    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I WONT BE FORGOTTEN

    I wont, right?

  69. I thought that diary came from the Spanish word for day and journal came from the French word for day. Because we record our days in them.

  70. 7:52 it is 2019 tho…..

  71. So we've been the same for thousands of years

  72. Remember me…………..

  73. For the past 20-ish generations a form of “nick” has been passed down to the first born in my family

  74. So this comment I am writing, will be saved? Hmph.

  75. I am the 6th

  76. Whats the Name of the track at the End?

  77. >chinese
    >14
    >6'2
    doubt

  78. Don’t forget

  79. That last part is exactly the lore behind the Mexican day of the dead.

    Also, I'm going to start recording myself talking about things I'm interested in for my kids. My father was a singer and died suddenly 2 yrs ago. I have countless recordings of him singing and it makes me so happy to hear them. I want my kids to have something like that in case something happens to me.

  80. Why did the pyramid builders care so much about water in the desert?

  81. Great video

  82. Creepy

  83. Lile this comment if you are in 2119!!!!!

  84. Who’s the best?
    Vsauce 1
    Vsauce 2
    Vsauce 3
    Reply

  85. Now I m preserved

  86. I was here .

  87. Happy birthday ! Stranger.

  88. I would like to see a hellabyte cause it sounds badass

  89. The "And as always, thanks for watching!" should be changed to "And as always, have fun with your existential crisis!".

  90. Hey, future people! I'm from 2019, and the world has 7.5 billion people in it. A lot of people on Earth are jerks, and cartoons are great right now! Vsauce2 is better than ever, and we still haven't invented the time machine. AI are starting to become dominant too!

  91. 0:55 wait
    age: 14?
    height: 6'2?
    occupation: nurse?
    what kind of kid is this

  92. I am an ordinary person

  93. This was magical.

  94. This is a comment

  95. I am here

  96. I have a Android

  97. Just recording my existence

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *