Inside Abandoned Cinema with Historical Past – Urbex Lost Places UK

Inside Abandoned Cinema with Historical Past – Urbex Lost Places UK


Once inside this derelict cinema in Northern
England, you can still see the Art Deco style it was built with back in the 1930s. The site still has a grand main hall, lighted
with an orange tint by a single flickering bulb overhead. Following suite with the site’s closure
due to a lack of visitors, only two explorers are looking through this grand structure of
past pleasure today. The faded warning signs didn’t worry us
because we had been told the site is hugely neglected, and access is very simple to the
cinema. Externally, you can no longer see the building’s
title in large letters, which would have lit up the night back when it was open. Now the shutters are down, and the structure
is in a bad shape. We entered in the basement and moved upstairs. On the opposite side of the smashed doors
lies the entrance hall, which although barely recognisable in the dark state it is in now,
had some lovely architectural features maintained from it’s construction. One thing we liked about the building was
the fact that it was all curved, something you wouldn’t see nowadays with the plain
rectangular cinemas we go to everyday. It is said that the curve was deliberately
done so to match the road’s turn outside. Upstairs there was the decaying remains of
a small Greek restaurant. On the walls we were amazed to see old records
of artists like Bon Jovi. You would think they would’ve been stolen
but as they are vandalised, it is likely they aren’t worth much now. When the cinema opened in the 1930s, it housed
one of the first projection system of it’s kind in the UK. The type of system automatically switched
the reels of film, and also controlled the lights in the hall. Therefore it was a revelation of it’s time. An orange glow caught our eye down a twisting
hallway. Following it led us into the impressive main
cinema hall. The Art Deco design was clearly visible in
the building on the ceiling and the stage where the screen once was and many films were
viewed. It was quite a challenge to film the room
fully as one half of it is hidden in shadow as the light casts down onto one side of the
hall. ‘So… that’s the light that is on. Obviously at some point all the others were
on as well, and that one there…if you can see it…has actually exploded. There’s a big black mark. So it must have been left on for absolutely
ages.’ The downstairs of the hall boasted another
cafe, we think this would’ve been instituted during the bingo hall period of the site so
visitors could get some food over long games. It might be hard to see the true colours of
the hall and it is hard for us to show them too, however if you adjust the white balance
on a photo, you get much better results. The 1500 plus seats the cinema had hosted
had long gone, in their place was piles of wood, and random objects. At some point we think there was some hoarding
going on in the cinema as there was some really strange stuff still there. After realising pretty much all of the other
back rooms are empty, we moved upstairs again to get onto the balcony, so we can have a
much better view of the hall. The balcony was massive, and we think more
of the seats would’ve been up here than on ground level. Unlike the theatre we posted recently, there
wasn’t seats on the balcony either, just markings where they once were. In addition, we could have a closer look at
the single bulb causing the almost eerie tinge over the cinema. You may wonder how this damaged building even
has power? From our knowledge, we know that a phone company
is using the rooftop of the building for a signal mast, therefore it is possible the
power is on for that. However, like the other bulb, we can’t imagine
this one will last, and will soon explode unless shut off. We believe the building closed because of
a lack of visitors, but firstly it changed from a cinema to a bingo hall in the 1960s. However, no traces of bingo can be found throughout
the structure. The pink and yellow walls were again visible
on the photographs we took. If you want to see more pictures of this place,
check out our Instagram in the description. We don’t think the cinema is too different
now than when it was in use. If the graffiti was removed, the seats reinstated,
the structure could have a similar use to what it was built for. Once we left the room our final plan for this
exploration was to make it onto the roof. After climbing the various spiral staircases
on offer, we eventually managed it, and it was worth it for the snowy views over the
surroundings. The roof was really icy, so we had to hold
onto anything we could to avoid any slips. It was a fitting end to the opening location
of a long day ahead of us. Therefore after this, we moved onwards to
our next spot. As for the cinema, it is for sale under £100
grand, yet it would still cost extra to retain it to it’s former glory. Many drive past it every day without knowing
of the architecturally beautiful shadow right before their eyes.

27 thoughts on “Inside Abandoned Cinema with Historical Past – Urbex Lost Places UK

  1. Nice one mate 👍

  2. Lost count of how many times I dabbed during the intro, but great video as usual lad!

  3. Amazing place

  4. Nice one guys. Be careful around phone masts high em fields can cause health issues. Sorry not trying to sound like a parent lol. Really enjoy your vids though keep it up 👍😀

  5. excellent as usual boys 🙂

  6. I really don’t understand why all of these abandoned places still have power and RUNNING WATER, like who pays for the electric and water bill? Lol

  7. 3 Words: Megacinema

  8. Who the heck would reck a Bon Jovi record ? Some very weird people out there anyway thank you for the Video.

  9. again another good video

  10. Yet another great film, tryed hard to figure out the location, this one defeated me!

  11. cool video guys, good to see your pics improving also, told you tripods help alot 😛

  12. Another cool exploration. We should head to the UK!

  13. Your videos are great keep up the good work

  14. Awesome Video! great lighting and as always love getting the history <3

  15. High Pressure Sodium in a theater? WTF? Definitely HID lighting, and the color is HPS. You can hear the ballast buzzing, too. The lamp is becoming unstable, the other one died of arc tube seal failure, and I would be willing to bet it had been "cycling" on and off at end of life (EOL) for quite a while. Still, HPS is a poor choice in this application. Mercury vapour would have been better suited, and those lamps, though they will dim as the arc tube blackens, would all still be operating as a rule today. HPS lamps have unpredictable lifespans. I see the original fixtures were incandescent art-deco fixtures, but the "efficiency police" in England would never allow THAT! At first I thought it was an incandescent, but the flickering indicated unstable discharge lamp. As you call them over there, SON lamps. I'd bet more things would still work there as well. Cheers from USA! 😀

  16. Late on this but good job again lads keep them up . Thank you for your uploads .

  17. Wow great location ! Thumbs up !

  18. Like many historic venues, once it lost it's purpose, it became a beached whale. The frightening costs to renovate the 80 year old structure will eventually doom it. Just as well to capture images now. Ta V. Much for the look inside.

  19. Very cool..👍👍
    So glad I found your channel, can't believe you don't have more subs! I will go back and watch all your vids.

  20. The black mark around the lights is normal. It is caused by the heat produced from these lights. They look like they are HPS lamps that produce an orange coloured light. They are very hot and dust trapped in the hot air movement sticks to the ceiling caused a black mark.
    It's not an explosion mark. This last working lamp will eventually burn out depending on how long it has been in.

  21. Great video as always guys, you know when the bingo closed as it’s strange that nothing remains it’s as if it never was I assume the cinema closed some time in the 70’s

  22. Wow thanks for another great explore. Such interesting history attached and beautiful achitecture inside. Super job guys 🙂

  23. Nice explore video guys. Thanks.

  24. How did you get inside? I would love to turn this place into a theatre. I live nearby.

  25. Nice explore. Great to see that this one is still around and in a restorable condition.

  26. Love your videos but I wish the background music wasn't so loud

  27. As far as i know this place is still on the market Sadly the telecommunication stuff seams the main priority of this place today There is this place and the Essoldo which have the same problem to many communication towers on them today This place was featured on Most Haunted few years back

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *