Drawing People in Perspective

Drawing People in Perspective


Welcome to Draw Tip Tuesday. Here’s your weekly dose of inspiration to build a creative habit one drawing at a time brought to you by Sketchbook Skool. Hi, welcome to Draw Tip Tuesday. Last week, we covered just the simple
basics of perspective drawing. And today I wanted to show you how you actually
apply this when you are drawing people. I love drawing people, especially
when I’m on location. There’s always people around so I really
want to include them in my drawings. Some of you might be intimidated by
it because: how do you even do it? And then you don’t even need
to go into detail. You can just with a few strokes actually
draw people, but I will show you. Generally when the Horizon is
in the center of the paper. That means that the eye level is somewhere
around an average person’s chest. Of course people differ in height, but
you can use it as a rule of thumb. And this is generally the view you would have
when you sit on a chair, for example. When you are standing, your eye level will be at the
same height as someone standing across from you. Think about it. If you’re talking to someone and you’re both standing,
you just look straight into each other’s eyes. It’s not like you’re looking up or looking down unless
the other person is really a lot taller or really a lot smaller than you are. So this means that you need to make the people’s
heads stick to the horizon line. And when you’re kneeling down or sitting on the ground
your eye level will be somewhere around the knees. So that means that people are really rising
up way above the horizon line. And I think this can be a very
interesting point of view. It can even add some drama
to your drawing I think. I hope this is helpful. And um, I know that it really helps me to think about
how to place people in a drawing so they’re not scattered around or it looks like one person is floating
in the air and the other is way too large or way too high or way too low on the drawing,
so I hope it really helps you too. And of course the horizon line
you cannot always see it. You also don’t really need to, you know, pencil it
in or something, but it’s just something that you need to have at the back of your mind. So if you’re standing eye
level is at eye level. If you’re sitting down eye level is at chest height,
and when you’re sitting down on the ground eye level is at knee height. If you just think about that. You’re probably going to be a lot better at drawing
people in proportion into your drawings. I hope this helps. I hope you will try it and remember:
practicing is key. The more you do it the better you get at it and if you
make mistakes, it doesn’t matter because there’s always a next page you can fill. Also make sure to subscribe to this channel so you don’t
miss out on my Draw Tip Tuesdays, and I will see you next week!

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